PRC Pressure on Taiwan

Same Strategy, New Tactics


Event Details
Friday, July 30, 2021
9:30–11:00 a.m.

REGISTER

Please join NBR for a virtual discussion examining the nature of China’s coercive actions, the implications for peace and security in the Taiwan Strait, and the role of the United States.

Since President Tsai was elected, the PRC has increased pressure on Taiwan, prompting renewed attention on U.S.- Taiwan policy in the event of a conflict. In 2021, the PRC is escalating military pressure and engaging in economic and diplomatic coercion. Recent reports indicate Beijing is using vaccine diplomacy to make diplomatic inroads in Latin American countries that recognize Taiwan, and blocking Taiwan’s ability to obtain vaccines. In April, 25 PRC aircraft, including four nuclear-capable bombers, entered Taiwan’s air defense identification zone (ADIZ). China’s recent pressure campaigns on Taiwan are likely to continue, further destabilizing cross-strait relations and affecting regional stability. Less clear is the impact on the United States’ policy of strategic ambiguity, whether recent actions reflect fundamental changes in China’s strategy, and how Taiwan’s strategy is adapting. China’s recent pressure campaigns on Taiwan are likely to continue, further destabilizing cross-strait relations and affecting regional stability. Less clear is the impact on the United States’ policy of strategic ambiguity, whether recent actions reflect fundamental changes in China’s strategy, and how Taiwan’s strategy is adapting.

Agenda


9:30 a.m. | WELCOME REMARKS

Roy D. Kamphausen, The National Bureau of Asian Research


9:35 a.m. | KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Congressman Ami Bera
United States House of Representatives


9:45 a.m. | AUDIENCE Q&A

Moderator
Roy D. Kamphausen, The National Bureau of Asian Research


9:55 a.m. | PANEL DISCUSSION

Moderator
Rachel Bernstein, The National Bureau of Asian Research

Panelists
Raymond Kuo, Independent Political Scientist
Shelley Rigger, Davidson College
Min-hua Chiang, National University of Singapore

Additional panelists to be confirmed


10:40 a.m.| AUDIENCE Q&A

11:00 a.m. | ADJOURN


About the Speakers

Congressman Ami Bera has represented California’s 7th Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives since 2013. The 7th district is located just east of California’s capital city, Sacramento, and lies entirely within Sacramento County. Representative Bera is currently a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, where he serves as Chairman of the Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific, Central Asia, and Nonproliferation. He is also a senior member on the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. Congressman Bera is also Vice Chair for Outreach for the New Democrat Coalition, a group of over 100 forward-thinking Democrats who are committed to pro-economic growth, pro-innovation, and fiscally responsible policies.

Min-Hua Chiang is a research fellow at the East Asian Institute (EAI), National University of Singapore. She obtained her PhD in economics from Université Pierre Mendès-France, now part of Université Grenoble Alpes, in France. Her research interests include Asia-Pacific regionalism, trade and investment, issues related to economic growth and development in East Asia. She is the author of two books: China-Taiwan Rapprochement: The Political Economy of Cross-Strait Relations (Routledge, 2016) and Post-Industrial Development in East Asia: Taiwan and South Korea in Comparison (Palgrave, 2018).

Raymond Kuo is an independent political scientist researching international security and East Asia. He authored two books this year: Contests of Initiative: Countering China’s Maritime Gray Zone Strategy (George Mason University-Westphalia Press) and Following the Leader: International Order, Alliance Strategies, and Emulation (Stanford University Press). Dr. Kuo’s other research has appeared in International Security, the Journal of Conflict Resolution, the National Interest, and the Diplomat, among others. He has previously worked for Fordham University, the University at Albany, SUNY, the United Nations, the National Democratic Institute, and the Democratic Progressive Party (Taiwan). Dr. Kuo holds a PhD and MA from Princeton University, an MSc from the London School of Economics, and a BA from Wesleyan University.

Shelley Rigger is the Brown Professor of Political Science at Davidson College. She is the author of Why Taiwan Matters: Small Island, Global Powerhouse, as well as two books on Taiwan’s domestic politics—Politics in Taiwan: Voting for Democracy and From Opposition to Power: Taiwan’s Democratic Progressive Party. Dr. Rigger has authored numerous articles on Taiwan’s domestic politics, the national identity issue in Taiwan-China relations, and related topics. She has a PhD from Harvard University and a BA from Princeton University. Her book The Tiger Leading the Dragon: How Taiwan Propelled China’s Economic Rise was published in June 2021.